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Steve A. Kay

Researcher ID

Profile
1981B.Sc.; University of Bristol, UK (Biochemistry)
1984Ph.D.; University of Bristol, UK (Biochemistry)
1985-1989Postdoctoral Fellow; The Rockefeller University, USA
1989-1991Assistant Professor; The Rockefeller University, USA
1992-1995Assistant Professor; University of Virginia, USA
1995-1996Associate Professor (tenured); University of Virginia, USA, Associate Professor; University of Virginia Medical School, USA
1996-1998Associate Professor; The Scripps Research Institute, USA
1999-2004Director; Discovery Research, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, USA
2002-2003Founder; Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President, Phenomix Corporation, USA
2000-presentAdjunct Professor; University of California, San Diego, USA
2001-2007Director; Institute for Childhood and Neglected Diseases, The Scripps Research Institute, USA
1998-2007Professor; The Scripps Research Institute, USA
2004-2007Chairman; Scripps Florida Steering Committee, USA
2005-2007Chairman; The Scripps Research Institute, USA
2007-2012Professor; University of California, San Diego, USA
2007-2012Richard C. Atkinson Chair in the Biological Sciences, USA
2007-2012Dean; Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, USA
2009-presentAdjunct Professor; Salk Institute for Biological Studies, USA
2012-presentProfessor; University of Southern California, USA
2012-presentDean; Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California, USA
2014-presentOverseas PI; WPI-ITbM, Nagoya University

Steve A. Kay (57) University of Southern California, USA
Website

Biological clock, systems biology

By using the resources of clock modifying compounds and genes in combination with state-of-the-art technologies at ITbM, the Kay-Hirota group aims to discover "transformative bio-molecules" that will revolutionize clock research and ultimately benefit human health. A unique combination of molecular, genetic, genomic, biochemical, and chemical biology approaches will allow us to reveal key regulatory processes of the circadian clock and define molecular links between the clock and rhythmic regulation of physiology and behavior. Proof-of-concept chemical probes will provide useful tools to control clock function in a conditional manner and also act as starting points for developing therapeutics for circadian clock-related disorders.

Research Highlights

Selected Awards and Honors

2015 Thomson Reuters "Most Influential Scientific Minds"
2014Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher
2014Honorary D.Sc. degree, University of Bristol, UK
2011Martin Gibbs Medal, American Society of Plant Biology
2010UCSD Chancellor's Associates Faculty Award for Excellence in Research
2009Elected Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS)

Selected Publications

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